colleennika:

This amazing video depicts Life, Death, And Rebirth In 75 seconds. I wrote a little thing about it. :)

4 notes

danforth:

Somebody strapped a camera to an eagle in France and WHOA

Wow

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explore-blog:

7-year-old Dexter writes to NASA about how much he wants to go to Mars. Lo and behold, NASA writes back.

It’s heartening to see that, even as the future of space exploration hangs in precarious balance, tomorrow glimmers with hope. Isaac Asimov would be infinitely proud of little Dexter, and so would Ray Bradbury.

Complement with this cinematic love letter to space exploration and the history of space and astronomy in 250 milestones.

( It’s Okay To Be Smart)

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derpycats:

Suddenly, the hunter became the hunted.

(Source: inthelandoflauren)

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One of the first signs of the beginning of understanding is the wish to die.
Frank Kafka (via twotonetint)

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matt-molloy:

186 photos of the sunset merged into one image using the lighten layer-blending mode in photoshop. I like the pattern in the clouds created from the interval between shots.

matt-molloy:

186 photos of the sunset merged into one image using the lighten layer-blending mode in photoshop. I like the pattern in the clouds created from the interval between shots.

69,604 notes

We need to make space for “creative reading” as much as “creative writing” – at least if we understand “creative reading” to be something like “ways of reading that are not only rigorous, careful, attentive to historical context, different connotations and nuances of meaning and so on, but also inventive, surprising, willing to take risks, to be experimental, to deform and transform.”
Nicholas Royle on “composition and decomposition.” Pair with Francine Prose on how to read like a writer and Virginia Woolf on how to read a book, then follow up with this 1936 to acquiring knowledge, of which critical reading is a centerpiece. (via explore-blog)

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“It’s irrelevant to me who they are,” he says. “All that matters is if it’s a good picture or a bad picture. That’s all I care about.”

A good picture for him revolves around a moment. A glance, a breath. Something that peels back the façade and reveals the personality of the subject.

“Photography is just the technique, it’s the grammar, but it’s never the content,” he says.

Legendary photographer Platon, who has taken portraits of some of the world’s greatest leaders, shares his secrets of ego-wrangling. (via explore-blog)

111 notes